Skip to main content

About your Search

English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
of what they had done. the queen of spain, the british parliament, two united states' presidents, supreme court justices, the american congress, the queen of england, they are all paying close attention to the debate. what do we do about these africans who have taken courage in hand and seized their own freedom? well, their self-emancipation, i want to suggest, had a lot of ripple effects around the atlantic, in europe, in africa, in the caribbean, and in america, especially in america where it had the impact of radicalizing the abolitionist movement, and by that i mean that more and more people began to recognize that the resistance of enslaved people was crucial to abolition. they began during the time of the rebellion to quote a famous line from lord byron. this is repeated again and again and again running all the way up to the civil war, and that line was those who would be free must themselves strike the first blow. in other words, action from below can be a trigger. this had a very dramatic impact op a lot of leading african-american intellectuals like henry highland-garnett, frede
to bring. can i bring a decent bottle? >> i hold the bottle that is very decent it is from spain and 1295 days dollars in defense sense per bottle. >> i don't know the menu. >> that does not matter for dinner. most people think they will have it right then and there but most people have their own wine ready. it is more as a gift. you put so much time into the wind you pick. >> it is always safe to break a sparkled wind. tracy: i am in crge of matching. piano in a war? >> it is the easiest. smoothes and the perfect read. >> my wife and i drink winn from argentina. every night white wine. tracy: started 1947? 1970 were on the map going from a really expensive bottle. >> i have the opportunity to taste the wine made clear year lincoln was shot. 1865. i decided it only had the opportunity once in my life. i went for it. i held the world record platt -- price of $520. it would be around $50,000 a bottle today. tracy: that was a lot of money back en. >> 105 years old at the time. tracy: some of the most expensive models you cuddle that like good newborn child >> this is so expensive and prious.
is not fine. what beshould do is start a war with spain or france. if we go that everyone will rally to the flag. the south will come in. everybody wants to be beat up on the europeans. he doesn't say it idly. he tells the ambassador from spain and france that it's a deal. the question is what does lincoln want to do. lincoln doesn't think the south is bluffing. he has a problem. the north is not unified behind a war effort. maybe only a third of northern want to fight a war to keep the south in union. about a third are happy about it. we get rid of them. they are fine. let's get rid of the south. we don't have to -- let them go. about a third don't care. we don't want them to leave we don't want to fight for it either. lincoln does something clever. some people want to spend armed expedition to reinforce sumter. some want to sneak these troops in to reinforce them. and they want to give it up. lincoln doesn't do any of them. lincoln announces publicly that he's going send an e petition it's only going to have food and no weapons or ammunition. just food. he's forcing the decision to
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
seems to be fixed. it's fixed. even though they're in a bit of a recession, a lost generation in spain, are they really fixed? we'll ask mark grant the tough questions bottom of the hour. , we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> facebook experiencing its fourth lockup today. today 160 million shares hitting the market. our next guest is an author of the book "the facebook era" clara shih the president of a company that has enterprises with large store networks on facebook linked in and other social networks. welcome back and good to see you again. >> good to see you. thanks for having me. >> i wonder what your take is short term on the lockup expiration. we've had it both ways this year. where
gave us a visa only if we didn't claim refugee status from spain. imagine. we got to spain, we did not know where to go. luckily enough, my husband it had family in hungary, but, i mean, iranian officials that have tops of money, and they find homes in the west. why? because they bring money with them, but then the disdance, honestly, when he landed in canada, we had $200 left in our pocket. we were literally hungry and no country was taking us, finally, canada -- and i'm so grateful to this country country of north that gave us a home where we had nowhere to be, just one thing, a little bit out of that, but i just need to make a point, are we going to get a time at the end? >> i'll give you time, sure. >> great, because there's something i have to add. >> okay, sure. the gentleman in the back row. >> good morning, the ceo of ther foundation,org, working with political prisoners, and i think some of you mentioned it's clear president obama is going to cut a deal or is going to try to cut a deal with the iranian regime over the nuclear weapons program that will, in fact, sacrifice p
-max hybrid. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to "hardball." there's a potentially big electoral story developing in pennsylvania that you need to hear about. the state's 20 electoral votes went for president obama this year, of course, as is the case in all but two states. the winner of a state's popular vote takes all its electoral votes. now a republican leader in the state of pennsylvania -- or the commonwealth i should say wants to change the rules of the game. state senate majority leader dominick peg leg give announced he plans to introduce legislation to change how the state allocates its electoral votes. according to mother jones magazine,
and what's happening in britain and spain and elsewhere, they have embarked upon deficit reduction. and what that has done is contract their economies when they still have very high unemployment, very high under utilization of a lot of resources that. means that their ratio of their debts to their total economies keeps on getting worse. if you want that kind of economy, that kind of austerity economics, well then what you want to do is raise taxes on the middle class and also cut government spending. if you don't you don't go that way. and casey, with all due respect, there are three people looking for jobs for every job opening these days. i don't see how you can say that they're being paid for not getting jobs. >> casey, why don't we put some incentives into this economy? why don't we make it pay to work after taxes? why don't we make it pay more to invest after tax? while we're doing that, casey, why don't we shrink the size and scope of government so that the private sector can keep its own resources and spend up more wisely than the government will? >> well, you're asking me t
power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with less chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine living your life with less chronic low back pain. imagine you, with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people taking maois or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymb
to spain and other countries and china the code to under 53 miles an hour -- tour de miles an hour -- 253 miles an hour. california where you are building new infrastructure, and do it at 2 under miles an hour. that is what we're going to do. in illinois the best we can do is 110 miles per hour. would we like to go to hundred? of course we would. it is not possible. >> it is a standard we can live with. >> that is right. there has been some criticism as well that the money that has not been spent yet, if you think it has been reasonable to has been the amount of money without developing the plan and making obligations for the studies that are required? is not ok to have obligated the money and still ask for more because we can obligate more ?hat's >> of the past four years we have not seen any bad deals from sweetheart deals with a cane to the $48 billion. none. we did the right way. by the book. we did it the way congress asked us to do its. we put 65,000 people to work over the last four years with the $40 billion with 15,000 projects. if people think we have been so slow, fine. i will
treatment for his spain not a pill, but a plant. cannabis also known at marijuana. for the most part he gross his own at his home in california central valley. when he wants to try out new varieties or buy plants makes the two hour drive to harbor side health center in oakland. >> what's the best that you have on the top shelf? >> guaranteed good clean medicine, quality, just a nice safe haven, people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood vcs or anywhere else, any neighborhood pharmacy. >> harbor side offers patients about 250 different strengths of cannabis in different forms. including edible, tinctures and creams. big business. they brought in $25 million in sales. money that cofounder steve deangelo would end up on the street. >> we have taken $25 million a year of illegal drug sales off the streets of oakland and brought them in to harbor side. >> deangelo has been a marijuana activists since he was a teenager. says when he moved to california in 2001 there weren't many places for patients to buy marijuana safely. >> i started harbor side to create a model of be
. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> today, connecticut investigators looking into the newtown school shooting. the shooter did not leave behind a note or a letter. they also say the hard drive had been removed and severely damaged as if it had been smashed with a hammer, so say the police. according to the washington post, the shooter had no social media profile. one former classmate said he had been home schooled for a time before attending the local high school. but, again, the investigation into the shooter is on going and a complete profile may not emerge for days or weeks yet. investigators hope to learn as much as they can by learning of the survivors of t
. he's headed back to the university of maryland and then spain. take a bow. nice to see you there, drew. he's done a great job and we will miss him. we leave you with this, check out peter doocy. you can have fun with the most popular video on youtube. here you
. pact wool expos from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. and this is the nokia lumia 920 from at&t. it's got live tiles so all my stuff's always right there in real-time. it's like the ultimate p
defeating spain to win the highest unemployment rate in europe. congratulations. not. next, $2 billion. that's how much a cable box cost when it's not even on. they continue to run using up electricity. the worst offenders, dvr's. that's $2 billion across the country. not just at your house. and finally, $5,000. that's the christmas bonus being handed to employees at publisher random house. they can thank this year's best seller "50 shades of gray" and $55,000 for christmas bonus. gretch, over to you and a couple of special guests. >> gretchen: this next story is an emotional one and the perfect one for the christmas season. five years ago, doctors told our next guest that he would never walk again. on christmas eve, he was involved in a deadly rather cash. older driver spun out of control, crashing into his family's suv, can iing both his father and his brother, 17-year-old girlfriend. brock was left paralyzed from the waist down. but he never stopped living his life and believing that he would walk again. and now in two weeks, guess what he's gog do? he's going to walk down the aisle unass
and i'd be happy to answer your questions. spain mr. chairman steve from cnbc. i have a lot of questions but i will offer a few here. why are there different targets for qe and for the funds rate? what does that achieve? secondly, what good is a target if you have to reference a calendar date. you pointed out in the statement that it's different from the calendar in october. do you have to keep doing that from now on and thirdly -- then you have another paragraph after that says, it's not just targeting something else though it's unclear what that these targets are if you have to reference the calendars date and the next calendar date it's not really targeted. >> well, first as i said the asset purchases and the rate increases have different objectives. the asset purchases are about creating near-term commitment creating growth and job commit in the near-term and the increases in the federal funds rate target when they ultimately occur are about accommodation. they are two very different objectives. secondly, the asset burgesses are a less well understood tool. we are learning over time
of questions. how does it apply to us. they're going through an awl lot in spain. it is a terrible economic situation. 50% unemployment for young people. 25% unemployment in the country. >> bill: wow. >> we think we got it bad. tricky stuff. >> bill: oh, boy. thanks for coming back from madrid just for -- >> just for the show. >> bill: for the "full court press" this morning. yesterday, we lost a real hero. a legendary united states senator in dan inouye died yesterday at the age of 88. he was known for many things. he had been representing hawaii. peter, as you know, since 1954. even before hawaii was a state. united states senator since 1963. and of course, a war hero. lost his right arm in combat in world war ii. was given the medal of honor by president clinton. >> which, by the way that's an amazing story about how he got that medal of honor and basically his hand, on a hand grenade. unbelievable. >> bill: he had one of the most distinctive speaking voices of any united states senator. here he is last yea
you, when you look the at how much money we're spending compared to our gdp, we're similar to spain, we're similar to greece, it's not a pretty scenario. >> harris: well, tell me this: what actually happens when we nudge up against it? >> well, everybody starts wondering when they're going to rise the debt ceiling, there's big pressure on republicans in congress to approve that. it's a big debate with them because they don't like to and then you have all of wall street looking at this, wondering whether we're going to be able to pay our bills and remember what happened last time around, the markets sold off 2000 points over a two month period. it was very dramatic. and really hurt people's 401(k)'s. >> harris: well, if you can't pay your bills you get a downgrade and we've seen that we could get our credit downgraded. >> again, again, that's the not good news. because you know what happens when you have a low credit rating, you can't borrow as much money. >> harris: that's what happens-- it costs you more to borrow and that's the trouble with that and all this have coming together,
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
[indiscernible] $750 billion came through and it was more aggressively priced than italy, spain, and portugal. that is where you create economic prosperity. the agencies are doing fantastic stuff but it will not create what we need on that continent. the marginal interventions are not going to create economic growth. we know how to create jobs, so instead of having large subsidy programs, start there. get rid of those programs and we can talk about economic growth. >> you can understand why they are the most prominent voices in the business. >> a look at social media and on line speech. this is half an hour. >> we are going to shift gears a bit. i took my tie off the war earlier this morning. first, there is wifi here. you should log on to the nyu guest account. user name is guest131. password is right there for you. we will talk about the use of social media. it has been on everyone's lips the last couple of years. we have wonderful guests that are known for their engagement with their audience. i predict we are going to hear a little bit of criticism and push back on some of the wisdom of s
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)